lunes, 31 de octubre de 2016

VA, MHS & international visitors talk relationships during Warrior Care in 21st Century symposium | Health.mil

VA, MHS & international visitors talk relationships during Warrior Care in 21st Century symposium | Health.mil

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  • Nathan Watt, a research associate at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, closely monitors data on a next-generation sequencer in The American Genome Center at the university. (DoD photo by Sarah Marshall)Nathan Watt, a research associate at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, closely monitors data on a next-generation sequencer in The American Genome Center at the university. (DoD photo by Sarah Marshall)Related Photos
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  • Nathan Watt, a research associate at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, closely monitors data on a next-generation sequencer in The American Genome Center at the university. This sequencing helps pinpoint genetic mutations that could serve as biomarkers, which can better predict disease risks and outcomes. TAGC is one of four academic genome centers in the U.S. and the only genome center in the federal system.  (DoD photo by Sarah Marshall)Nathan Watt, a research associate at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, closely monitors data on a next-generation sequencer in The American Genome Center at the university. This sequencing helps pinpoint genetic mutations that could serve as biomarkers, which can better predict disease risks and outcomes. TAGC is one of four academic genome centers in the U.S. and the only genome center in the federal system. (DoD photo by Sarah Marshall)Related Photos
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  • Lida Citroën, an international branding specialist based in Denver, Colorado, moderated a panel discussion on international and interagency relationships on Oct. 27, 2016, at James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Panelists included Colonel James A. Kile of Canada, Brigadier-General Dr. Gernd Mattiesen of Germany, Mrs. Natalia Melnychenko of Ukraine, Colonel Professor Vsevolod Stebliuk of Ukraine and Dr. Linda Spoonster Schwartz of the United States. (Department of Veterans Affairs photo)Lida Citroën, an international branding specialist based in Denver, Colorado, moderated a panel discussion on international and interagency relationships on Oct. 27, 2016, at James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Panelists included Colonel James A. Kile of Canada, Brigadier-General Dr. Gernd Mattiesen of Germany, Mrs. Natalia Melnychenko of Ukraine, Colonel Professor Vsevolod Stebliuk of Ukraine and Dr. Linda Spoonster Schwartz of the United States. (MHS photo)Related Photos
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  • Army Maj. Nicolas Cahanding with Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas, looks at a brain image. (U.S. Army photo by Robert Whetstone) Army Maj. Nicolas Cahanding with Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas, looks at a brain image. (U.S. Army photo by Robert Whetstone)Related Photos
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  • Brigadier-General Hugh Colin MacKay, OMM, CD, QHP, surgeon general of Canadian Forces, confers with Dr. Karen Guice, acting assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs at the 2016 Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida. The 2017 Symposium will be held in Canada. (Courtesy photo)Brigadier-General Hugh Colin MacKay, OMM, CD, QHP, surgeon general of Canadian Forces, confers with Dr. Karen Guice, acting assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs at the 2016 Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida. The 2017 Symposium will be held in Canada. (Courtesy photo)Related Photos
  • Brigadier-General Hugh Colin MacKay, OMM, CD, QHP, surgeon general of Canadian Forces, confers with Dr. Karen Guice, acting assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs at the 2016 Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida. The 2017 Symposium will be held in Canada. (Courtesy photo)Brigadier-General Hugh Colin MacKay, OMM, CD, QHP, surgeon general of Canadian Forces, confers with Dr. Karen Guice, acting assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs at the 2016 Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida. The 2017 Symposium will be held in Canada. (Courtesy photo)More related photos
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  • Fourth-year medical students from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences practiced their skills during Operation Bushmaster, a field exercise that took place Oct. 10-22 at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa. (DoD photo by Sarah Marshall)Fourth-year medical students from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences practiced their skills during Operation Bushmaster, a field exercise that took place Oct. 10-22 at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa. (DoD photo by Sarah Marshall)More related photos
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  • During a field exercise, Operation Bushmaster, fourth-year medical students from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences were constantly faced with unfolding scenarios. While triaging the wounded, they prepared for their evacuation and care in flight. (DoD photo by Sharon Holland)During a field exercise, Operation Bushmaster, fourth-year medical students from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences were constantly faced with unfolding scenarios. While triaging the wounded, they prepared for their evacuation and care in flight. (DoD photo by Sharon Holland)More related photos
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  • Navy Lt. Cmdr. Denise Thigpen, director, Breast Imaging Center at the Murtha Cancer Center at Walter Reed Bethesda, reads two mammograms of a patient. (Courtesy photo)Navy Lt. Cmdr. Denise Thigpen, director, Breast Imaging Center at the Murtha Cancer Center at Walter Reed Bethesda, reads two mammograms of a patient. (Courtesy photo)More related photos
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  • Col. Cary Harbaugh, director of Care Coalition at U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), represented the host of the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium as he welcomed attendees to MacDill Air Force Base on October 25, 2016 in Tampa, Florida. Speaking on behalf of Gen. Raymond A. Thomas III, commanding general of USSOCOM, Harbaugh described the care provided to over 10,000 wounded, ill and injured service members, veterans and family members through the command’s Care Coalition. “General Thomas always highlights that the key to USSOCOM’s success is our people. They’re our most precious asset and our comparative, competitive and decisive advantage.” (Courtesy photo)Col. Cary Harbaugh, director of Care Coalition at U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), represented the host of the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium as he welcomed attendees to MacDill Air Force Base on October 25, 2016 in Tampa, Florida. Speaking on behalf of Gen. Raymond A. Thomas III, commanding general of USSOCOM, Harbaugh described the care provided to over 10,000 wounded, ill and injured service members, veterans and family members through the command’s Care Coalition. “General Thomas always highlights that the key to USSOCOM’s success is our people. They’re our most precious asset and our comparative, competitive and decisive advantage.” (Courtesy photo)More related photos
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  • Leaders from all over the world joined for the opening remarks for the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida, on October 25, 2016. Many countries were represented as leaders from Australia, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, France, Georgia, Germany, Jordan, Lithuania, Netherlands, New Zealand, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States introduced themselves to guests in the room. (Courtesy photo)Leaders from all over the world joined for the opening remarks for the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida, on October 25, 2016. A total of many countries were represented as leaders from Australia, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, France, Georgia, Germany, Jordan, Lithuania, Netherlands, New Zealand, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States introduced themselves to guests in the room. (Courtesy photo)More related photos
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  • Leaders from all over the world joined for the opening remarks for the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida, on October 25, 2016. Many countries were represented as leaders from Australia, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, France, Georgia, Germany, Jordan, Lithuania, Netherlands, New Zealand, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States introduced themselves to guests in the room. (Courtesy photo)Leaders from all over the world joined for the opening remarks for the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida, on October 25, 2016. Many countries were represented as leaders from Australia, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, France, Georgia, Germany, Jordan, Lithuania, Netherlands, New Zealand, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States introduced themselves to guests in the room. (Courtesy photo)More related photos
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  • Dr. Karen Guice, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, provided remarks at the first day of the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida. “We fight together and we heal together,” she said of the collaborative approach and engagement that was represented by attendees. “Sharing our approaches and our research in solving the kind of problems that lead to innovative ways to address and solve each one together – this work never stops. Now is not the time to become complacent or reduce our focus, nor is it the time to limit investments.” (Courtesy photo)Dr. Karen Guice, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, provided remarks at the first day of the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida. “We fight together and we heal together,” she said of the collaborative approach and engagement that was represented by attendees. “Sharing our approaches and our research in solving the kind of problems that lead to innovative ways to address and solve each one together – this work never stops. Now is not the time to become complacent or reduce our focus, nor is it the time to limit investments.” (Courtesy photo)More related photos
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  • U.S. Air Force Emergency room doctors and technicians treat patients with simulated injuries and illnesses during a medical global response force training exercise at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Members of the medical group put the 25-bed field hospital to the test while treating real-world and simulated patients. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard)U.S. Air Force Emergency room doctors and technicians treat patients with simulated injuries and illnesses during a medical global response force training exercise at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Members of the medical group put the 25-bed field hospital to the test while treating real-world and simulated patients. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard)More related photos
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  • Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications. In other words, you could be getting too much or too little of the medications that you need, which can be dangerous to your health. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications. In other words, you could be getting too much or too little of the medications that you need, which can be dangerous to your health. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)More related photos
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  • Army Col. Craig Shriver is director of the John P. Murtha Cancer Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.Army Col. Craig Shriver is director of the John P. Murtha Cancer Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.More related photos
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  • The Drug Enforcement Agency sponsors the National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, which lets people safely and securely dispose of potentially dangerous unused, unwanted and expired prescription drugs. (Courtesy graphic)The Drug Enforcement Agency sponsors the National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, which lets people safely and securely dispose of potentially dangerous unused, unwanted and expired prescription drugs. (Courtesy graphic)More related photos
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  • Air Force Master Sgt. Sam Mullins, second from the left, participated in an organized event earlier in September to raise awareness for prostate cancer. He was joined by his wife, Sharon, and his children, Audrey and Ethan. Dr. Matthew Stringer, far left, who helped operate on Mullin’s cancer, participated in the event as well. (Photo Courtesy of Sam Mullins)Air Force Master Sgt. Sam Mullins, second from the left, participated in an organized event earlier in September to raise awareness for prostate cancer. He was joined by his wife, Sharon, and his children, Audrey and Ethan. Dr. Matthew Stringer, far left, who helped operate on Mullin’s cancer, participated in the event as well. (Photo Courtesy of Sam Mullins)More related photos
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  • A series of Broselow pediatric emergency kits, weight-based resuscitation medical kits for children, lie atop a stretcher during pediatric malady training. Shock Trauma Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit conducted the training during PHIBLEX 33 to prepare its Sailors to treat child patients. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tiffany Edwards)A series of Broselow pediatric emergency kits, weight-based resuscitation medical kits for children, lie atop a stretcher during pediatric malady training. Shock Trauma Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit conducted the training during PHIBLEX 33 to prepare its Sailors to treat child patients. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tiffany Edwards)More related photos
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  • Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency, talks to the Association of Women Surgeons meeting in Washington, D.C.Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency, talks to the Association of Women Surgeons meeting in Washington, D.C.More related photos
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  • Army Staff Sgt. Tierra Brown, a 392nd Army Band vocalist, was seen by millions singing the National Anthem during the CNN Town Hall with President Barack Obama at Fort Lee, Virginia, Sept. 28. Brown, a Soldier of 14 years, has battled post-traumatic stress disorder for years. (U.S. Army photo by T. Anthony Bell)Army Staff Sgt. Tierra Brown, a 392nd Army Band vocalist, was seen by millions singing the National Anthem during the CNN Town Hall with President Barack Obama at Fort Lee, Virginia, Sept. 28. Brown, a Soldier of 14 years, has battled post-traumatic stress disorder for years. (U.S. Army photo by T. Anthony Bell)More related photos
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  • Navy Medicine treats and prevents women’s health issues around the world, including ships at sea, using innovative technology and research. The fleet ensures that its ships are equipped to support basic women’s health needs. While the depth of resources depends on the size and mission of each ship, all are equipped with emergency and routine birth control options, basic testing for sexually transmitted infections, equipment for well-woman exams and sick call examinations, and most importantly a professionally trained medical provider. (U.S. Navy photo)Navy Medicine treats and prevents women’s health issues around the world, including ships at sea, using innovative technology and research. The fleet ensures that its ships are equipped to support basic women’s health needs. While the depth of resources depends on the size and mission of each ship, all are equipped with emergency and routine birth control options, basic testing for sexually transmitted infections, equipment for well-woman exams and sick call examinations, and most importantly a professionally trained medical provider. (U.S. Navy photo)More related photos
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  • Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency, said military members have to be ready to go anywhere in the world on short notice. To help solve the complexity of care with that readiness aspect, Bono pointed to the Military Health System’s new electronic health record, MHS GENESIS, as key to helping conversations between doctors and patients, no matter where people are. (Courtesy photo)Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency, said military members have to be ready to go anywhere in the world on short notice. To help solve the complexity of care with that readiness aspect, Bono pointed to the Military Health System’s new electronic health record, MHS GENESIS, as key to helping conversations between doctors and patients, no matter where people are. (Courtesy photo)More related photos
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  • Navy corpsmen treat a notional casualty during a training evolution on Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The Navy Medical Augmentation Program Sustainment Training brings corpsmen from up and down the east coast to Camp Lejeune to get hands-on training. The corpsmen are all attached to the 2nd Medical Battalion but are assigned at different stations throughout the east coast. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jon Sosner)Navy corpsmen treat a notional casualty during a training evolution on Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The Navy Medical Augmentation Program Sustainment Training brings corpsmen from up and down the east coast to Camp Lejeune to get hands-on training. The corpsmen are all attached to the 2nd Medical Battalion but are assigned at different stations throughout the east coast. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jon Sosner)More related photos
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  • Early detection of the breast cancer can provide early treatment for the service member and or their beneficiaries. For those women diagnosed with localized (Stage 1) breast cancer there is a more than 98 percent probability that they will survive five or more years. (U.S. Air Force photo by L.A. Shively)Early detection of the breast cancer can provide early treatment for the service member or their beneficiaries. For those women diagnosed with localized (Stage 1) breast cancer there is a more than 98 percent probability that they will survive five or more years. (U.S. Air Force photo by L.A. Shively)More related photos
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  • Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Carly Marcum, administers an influenza vaccination to a Sailor aboard USS John C. Stennis. This flu season, the DoD’s entire supply of flu vaccine will be injectable. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Cole C. Pielop)Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Carly Marcum, administers an influenza vaccination to a Sailor aboard USS John C. Stennis. This flu season, the DoD’s entire supply of flu vaccine will be injectable. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Cole C. Pielop)More related photos
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  • San Antonio Military Medical Center Emergency Department staff treat a patient on Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The emergency department serves 20 counties in the Texas region and treats roughly 200 patients a day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)San Antonio Military Medical Center Emergency Department staff treat a patient on Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The emergency department serves 20 counties in the Texas region and treats roughly 200 patients a day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)More related photos
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  • Air Force Capt. (Dr.) Kjell Ballard, emergency room resident, asks a patient to make the OK sign to check mobility of the fingers at the San Antonio Military Medical Center on Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Serving 20 counties in the Texas region, the SAMMC Emergency Department treats roughly 200 patients a day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)Air Force Capt. (Dr.) Kjell Ballard, emergency room resident, asks a patient to make the OK sign to check mobility of the fingers at the San Antonio Military Medical Center on Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Serving 20 counties in the Texas region, the SAMMC Emergency Department treats roughly 200 patients a day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)More related photos
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  • Navy Lt. Cmdr. Erik Ramey, reviews a patient’s x-ray as part of a routine screening mammogram. A mammogram can often detect breast cancer long before it can be felt and usually years before physical symptoms appear. If detected early, breast cancer treatment can be less invasive and more successful.  (DoD photo illustration)Navy Lt. Cmdr. Erik Ramey, reviews a patient’s x-ray as part of a routine screening mammogram. A mammogram can often detect breast cancer long before it can be felt and usually years before physical symptoms appear. If detected early, breast cancer treatment can be less invasive and more successful. (DoD photo illustration)More related photos
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  • Navy Hospitalman Recruit Joseph Hinson, of Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, takes vital signs of Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Airman Krista Leandry during a physical exam. One of the most important things women can do to maintain good health is schedule an annual Well Woman visit with their healthcare provider. Well Woman exams help assess individual risks for women and can provide services for immunizations, contraceptives, screening for disease and counselling for sexually transmitted infections. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)Navy Hospitalman Recruit Joseph Hinson, of Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, takes vital signs of Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Airman Krista Leandry during a physical exam. One of the most important things women can do to maintain good health is schedule an annual Well Woman visit with their healthcare provider. Well Woman exams help assess individual risks for women and can provide services for immunizations, contraceptives, screening for disease and counselling for sexually transmitted infections. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)More related photos
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  • On Sept. 28, 2016, approximately 170 years after the war, as many as 13 skeletal remains were returned to U.S. soil and honored during a solemn movement at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. (U.S. Air Force photo)On Sept. 28, 2016, approximately 170 years after the war, as many as 13 skeletal remains were returned to U.S. soil and honored during a solemn movement at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. (U.S. Air Force photo)More related photos
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  • U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are often exposed to high noise levels, hearing protection is crucial, especially with a TBI. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Stephen Schester)U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are often exposed to high noise levels, hearing protection is crucial, especially with a TBI. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Stephen Schester)More related photos
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  • Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Paradiso participates in a sunrise yoga class on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. If you’re thinking of adding exercise to your pain management plan, consider the following types: aerobic, strength, and flexibility. But make sure your exercise program is specifically tailored to your needs. Some exercises might be easier or more difficult to complete depending upon the type and location of your pain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Liaghat)Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Paradiso participates in a sunrise yoga class on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. If you’re thinking of adding exercise to your pain management plan, consider the following types: aerobic, strength, and flexibility. But make sure your exercise program is specifically tailored to your needs. Some exercises might be easier or more difficult to complete depending upon the type and location of your pain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Liaghat)More related photos
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