viernes, 26 de mayo de 2017

Surgeries in Hospital-Based Ambulatory Surgery and Hospital Inpatient Settings, 2014 #223

Surgeries in Hospital-Based Ambulatory Surgery and Hospital Inpatient Settings, 2014 #223

AHRQ News Now

AHRQ Stats: Outpatient Cardiac Surgeries

In 2014, 53 percent of hospital-based surgeries involving the insertion, revision, replacement or removal of a cardiac pacemaker or cardioverter/defibrillator were performed in an outpatient setting. (Source: AHRQ, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Statistical Brief #223, Surgeries in Hospital-Based Ambulatory Surgery and Hospital Inpatient Settings, 2014.)

May 2017


Surgeries in Hospital-Based Ambulatory Surgery and Hospital Inpatient Settings, 2014


Claudia A. Steiner, M.D., M.P.H., Zeynal Karaca, Ph.D., Brian J. Moore, Ph.D., Melina C. Imshaug, M.P.H., and Gary Pickens, Ph.D. 
Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project logo
Highlights
  • In 2014, 17.2 million hospital visits (ambulatory or inpatient) included invasive, therapeutic surgeries. Over half of these visits (57.8 percent) occurred in a hospital-owned ambulatory surgery (AS) setting, and the remaining (42.2 percent) were inpatient.


  • Private insurance was the primary expected payer for 48.6 percent of AS visits. Medicare was the most common payer among inpatient surgical stays (43.4 percent).


  • The following procedures were among the most common invasive, therapeutic ambulatory surgeries:
    • Lens and cataract procedures (99.9 percent performed in AS settings)
    • Excision of semilunar cartilage of knee (98.7 percent in AS)
    • Tonsillectomy (95.6 percent in AS)
    • Decompression peripheral nerve (95.2 percent in AS)
    • Inguinal and femoral hernia repair (92.0 percent in AS)
    • Incision or fusion of joint, destruction of joint lesion (80.4 percent in AS)
    • Operating room (OR) procedures of skin and breast (78.5 percent in AS)
    • Muscle, tendon, and soft tissue OR procedures (71.9 percent in AS)
    • Repair of diaphragmatic, incisional, and umbilical hernia (61.1 percent in AS)
    • Cholecystectomy (60.8 percent in AS)

Toolkit To Reduce CAUTI and Other HAIs in Long-Term Care Facilities | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

Toolkit To Reduce CAUTI and Other HAIs in Long-Term Care Facilities | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

AHRQ--Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Advancing Excellence in Health Care



Toolkit To Reduce CAUTI and Other HAIs in Long-Term Care Facilities

CUSP LogoThe Toolkit To Reduce CAUTI and other HAIs in Long-Term Care Facilities helps long-term care (LTC) facilities reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) and improve practices to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Based on principles and methods from the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP), the toolkit provides resources to enhance leadership and staff engagement, teamwork, and safety culture, in order to facilitate consistent use of evidence-based practices. The toolkit includes instructional materials and resources in infection prevention best practices (e.g., foundational infection prevention strategies, CAUTI prevention, antibiotic stewardship), resident and family engagement, quality improvement, and sustainability to guide your facility through implementing an improvement project to reduce HAIs. The toolkit's resources were used by LTC facilities that participated in the AHRQ Safety Program for Long-Term Care: HAIs/CAUTI, which successfully reduced CAUTI rates.

How To Use This Toolkit

The toolkit is organized into three main sections that your facility can use to implement an improvement project to reduce CAUTI and other HAIs. Each section contains guides, tools, slide sets, and videos to support implementation. All materials are publicly available and downloadable online. Many can be modified to meet local facility needs and criteria.

Toolkit Sections

Each section contains customizable resources that your facility can use to implement an improvement project to reduce CAUTI and other HAIs.

About the Toolkit Development

The toolkit was developed during a 3-year project, the AHRQ Safety Program for Long-Term Care: HAIs/CAUTI, which involved a national quality improvement collaborative designed to reduce CAUTIs and enhance patient safety culture and practices. The project brought together subject matters experts from partner organizations and approximately 500 participating long-term care facilities across the country.
Page last reviewed May 2017
Page originally created July 2014
Internet Citation: Toolkit To Reduce CAUTI and Other HAIs in Long-Term Care Facilities. Content last reviewed May 2017. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/quality-resources/tools/cauti-ltc/index.html

A National Implementation Project to Prevent Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents. - PubMed - NCBI

A National Implementation Project to Prevent Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents. - PubMed - NCBI



 2017 May 19. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1689. [Epub ahead of print]

National Implementation Project to Prevent Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI) in nursing home residents is a common cause of sepsis, hospital admission, and antimicrobial use leading to colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms.

OBJECTIVE:

To develop, implement, and evaluate an intervention to reduce catheter-associated UTI.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

A large-scale prospective implementation project was conducted in community-based nursing homes participating in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Safety Program for Long-Term Care. Nursing homes across 48 states, Washington DC, and Puerto Rico participated. Implementation of the project was conducted between March 1, 2014, and August 31, 2016.

INTERVENTIONS:

The project was implemented over 12-month cohorts and included a technical bundle: catheter removal, aseptic insertion, using regular assessments, training for catheter care, and incontinence care planning, as well as a socioadaptive bundle emphasizing leadership, resident and family engagement, and effective communication.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES:

Urinary catheter use and catheter-associated UTI rates using National Healthcare Safety Network definitions were collected. Facility-level urine culture order rates were also obtained. Random-effects negative binomial regression models were used to examine changes in catheter-associated UTI, catheter utilization, and urine cultures and adjusted for covariates including ownership, bed size, provision of subacute care, 5-star rating, presence of an infection control committee, and an infection preventionist.

RESULTS:

In 4 cohorts over 30 months, 568 community-based nursing homes were recruited; 404 met inclusion criteria for analysis. The unadjusted catheter-associated UTI rates decreased from 6.78 to 2.63 infections per 1000 catheter-days. With use of the regression model and adjustment for facility characteristics, the rates decreased from 6.42 to 3.33 (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.36-0.58; P < .001). Catheter utilization was 4.5% at baseline and 4.9% at the end of the project. Catheter utilization remained unchanged (4.50 at baseline, 4.45 at conclusion of project; IRR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.03; P = .26) in adjusted analyses. The number of urine cultures ordered for all residents decreased from 3.49 per 1000 resident-days to 3.08 per 1000 resident-days. Similarly, after adjustment, the rates were shown to decrease from 3.52 to 3.09 (IRR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.77-0.94; P = .001).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

In a large-scale, national implementation project involving community-based nursing homes, combined technical and socioadaptive catheter-associated UTI prevention interventions successfully reduced the incidence of catheter-associated UTIs.

PMID:
 
28525923
 
DOI:
 
10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1689

Study Shows 54 Percent Drop in Infections Among Nursing Home Patients | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

Study Shows 54 Percent Drop in Infections Among Nursing Home Patients | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

AHRQ News Now

Study Shows 54 Percent Drop in Infections Among Nursing Home Patients

Rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) dropped by 54 percent across more than 400 nursing homes that participated in an AHRQ-funded patient safety project, according to a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine. CAUTI, a type of healthcare-associated infection common in nursing homes, can lead to serious illness and significant expenses for antibiotics and hospitalizations. The safety project adapted AHRQ’s Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) for use in long-term care facilities. Previous AHRQ efforts to implement CUSP and other safety programs in hospitals have led to significant reductions in CAUTIs and bloodstream infections. As part of the project to help doctors, nurses and other leaders prevent CAUTIs in nursing homes, AHRQ has released a Toolkit To Reduce CAUTIs and Other HAIs in Long-Term Care Facilities. For more information about the reduction of CAUTIs in nursing homes, access the study abstract or AHRQ’s press release.

AHRQ--Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Advancing Excellence in Health Care

Study Shows 54 Percent Drop in Infections Among Nursing Home Patients

AHRQ safety program leads to fewer catheter-associated urinary tract infections
Press Release Date: May 19, 2017
Rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) dropped by 54 percent across more than 400 long-term care facilities that participated in a patient safety project funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.
The project adapted AHRQ's Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) for use in long-term care facilities. Data from nursing homes in 38 states were included in the new analysis. Previous AHRQ efforts to implement CUSP and other safety programs in hospitals have led to significant reductions in CAUTIs and bloodstream infections associated with central line catheters.
"We continue to see the power of AHRQ tools to help front-line staff tackle safety problems, now in nursing homes as well as hospitals," said Jeffrey Brady, M.D., M.P.H., director of AHRQ's Center for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. "This means that some of the most vulnerable members of society – those who reside in long-term care facilities and nursing homes – are less likely to be harmed as a result of infections."
CAUTI is a type of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) that is common in long-term care facilities, where up to 10 percent of residents have urinary catheters. CAUTI can sometimes lead to severe illness and hospitalization and generates significant expenses for antibiotics and hospitalizations. The infections are generally treatable with antibiotics, but long-term or repeated use of antibiotics can increase the risk of other infections as well as lead to development of antibiotic resistance.
CUSP is designed to promote improvement in leadership, teamwork, communication and safety culture to facilitate consistent use of evidence-based practices for infection prevention.  During the project, CAUTI rates dropped from about 6.4 to 3.3 per 1,000 catheter days. Three-quarters of the facilities showed a CAUTI rate reduction of at least 40 percent, indicating that this approach could benefit a majority of long-term care facilities.
Researchers also found that orders for urine cultures – tests to find germs in the urine – decreased by 15 percent during the study period. Best practices encouraged in the project included avoiding urine cultures for most patients without symptoms.
"This project is an example of translating research into practice using innovative implementation strategies and by empowering front-line teams," said Lona Mody, M.D., of the University of Michigan and VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, lead author of the study.
The study of CAUTI-prevention strategies was part of a multiyear national implementation project. The reductions took place during rolling 12-month periods from 2014 to 2016 in participating community-based nursing homes. Funded by AHRQ, the contract was led by the Health Research & Educational Trust of the American Hospital Association and a team of partners.
"This project was much more than just learning about urine cultures, antibiotics and catheters," said Amanda Calhoun, R.N., Assistant Director of Nurses and CAUTI Team Leader at Belle View Estates Rehabilitation and Care Center, one of the facilities that participated in the project. "It gave me the confidence to help improve the care of the people in our community."
To help doctors, nurses and other leaders in all long-term care facilities prevent CAUTIs, AHRQ has released a Toolkit to Reduce CAUTIs and Other HAIs in Long-Term Care Facilities. This practical resource is based on the experiences of facilities that participated in the project. It includes checklists and other tools and educational materials to guide facilities that seek to apply infection-reduction programs.
AHRQ, part of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), works with other federal agencies, researchers, and providers to prevent and reduce HAIs and combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. AHRQ's mission is to produce evidence to make health care safer, higher quality, more accessible, equitable and affordable and to work within HHS and with other partners to make sure that the evidence is understood and used. For more information about AHRQ's work to prevent HAIs, visit www.ahrq.gov/hais.
Page last reviewed May 2017
Page originally created May 2017
Internet Citation: Study Shows 54 Percent Drop in Infections Among Nursing Home Patients. Content last reviewed May 2017. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/newsroom/press-releases/cauti.html

Three-Year Impacts Of The Affordable Care Act: Improved Medical Care And Health Among Low-Income Adults. - PubMed - NCBI

AHRQ News Now





Affordable Care Act Coverage Expansions Associated With Economic, Health Benefits

Insurance coverage expansions under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) had measurable economic and health benefits for low-income adults and those with chronic conditions, according to research partially funded by AHRQ and published in Health Affairs. Researchers examined the status of low-income adults in three states: Arkansas, which expanded private insurance to low-income adults using the ACA-enabled federal marketplace; Kentucky, which expanded Medicaid under the ACA; and Texas, which did not expand coverage at all. Over the three-year study period ending in 2016, the uninsured rates in Arkansas and Kentucky dropped by more than 20 percentage points compared with Texas, researchers found. For previously uninsured adults, newly acquired health coverage was associated with a 41 percentage-point increase in having a usual source of care, a $337 per person reduction in annual out-of-pocket spending, significant increases in preventive health visits and glucose testing, and a 23 percentage-point increase in self reports of “excellent” health. Among adults with chronic conditions, researchers found improvements in affordability of care, regular care, medication adherence and self-reported health. Access the abstract.


Three-Year Impacts Of The Affordable Care Act: Improved Medical Care And Health Among Low-Income Adults. - PubMed - NCBI



 2017 May 17. pii: 10.1377/hlthaff.2017.0293. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2017.0293. [Epub ahead of print]

Three-Year Impacts Of The Affordable Care Act: Improved Medical Care And Health Among Low-Income Adults.

Abstract

Major policy uncertainty continues to surround the Affordable Care Act (ACA) at both the state and federal levels. We assessed changes in health care use and self-reported health after three years of the ACA's coverage expansion, using survey data collected from low-income adults through the end of 2016 in three states: Kentucky, which expanded Medicaid; Arkansas, which expanded private insurance to low-income adults using the federal Marketplace; and Texas, which did not expand coverage. We used a difference-in-differences model with a control group and an instrumental variables model to provide individual-level estimates of the effects of gaining insurance. By the end of 2016 the uninsurance rate in the two expansion states had dropped by more than 20 percentage points relative to the nonexpansion state. For uninsured people gaining coverage, this change was associated with a 41-percentage-point increase in having a usual source of care, a $337 reduction in annual out-of-pocket spending, significant increases in preventive health visits and glucose testing, and a 23-percentage-point increase in "excellent" self-reported health. Among adults with chronic conditions, we found improvements in affordability of care, regular care for those conditions, medication adherence, and self-reported health.

KEYWORDS:

Access To Care; Health Reform; Insurance Coverage < Insurance; Medicaid

PMID:
 
28515140
 
DOI:
 
10.1377/hlthaff.2017.0293

Opioid Hospital Stays/Emergency Department Visits - HCUP Fast Stats

Opioid Hospital Stays/Emergency Department Visits - HCUP Fast Stats

AHRQ News Now

AHRQ’s Online Fast Stats Tool Provides Updated Data on Opioid-Related Hospitalizations

AHRQ’s Fast Stats database now provides updated statistics on opioid-related hospitalizations for researchers, policymakers, clinicians and others who are tackling the opioid epidemic. The opioid-related updates include 2015 inpatient data for 28 states, 2015 emergency department data for 19 states, and 2016 quarterly inpatient data for 14 states. You can use the database to find where your state ranks. For example, in 2014, data show that the three states with the highest opioid-related hospitalization rates were Maryland, Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. The three states with the lowest rates were Iowa, Nebraska and Wyoming.  Access Fast Stats, part of AHRQ’s Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project.
Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project logo

Providing The Tools To Improve Women's Health Care | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

Providing The Tools To Improve Women's Health Care | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

AHRQ--Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Advancing Excellence in Health Care

AHRQ Views

Blog posts from AHRQ leaders

Sharon Arnold
As we mark National Women's Health Week, which began on Mother's Day and continues until May 20, it's important to underscore AHRQ's ongoing commitment to addressing women's health care needs.
About 250,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year; despite advances in detection and treatment, 40,000 die of the disease. About half of women over age 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis. Millions must eventually deal with urinary incontinence, a condition significantly more common in women than men. And many women must confront complex decisions about gender-specific surgeries, such as whether to give birth via cesarean section  or whether or not to have a hysterectomy.
As the Nation's doctors, nurses, and other health professionals stand beside women as they tackle these challenges, AHRQ's role is to develop and disseminate reliable, practical evidence to support the best possible outcomes.
For example, AHRQ provides online decision aids for patients to work with their clinicians when thinking about treatment options for urinary incontinence and osteoporosis.
AHRQ also offers research summaries for clinicians, which provide bottom-line treatment information on topics such as core-needle biopsy for breast abnormalities, management of post-partum hemorrhage, and management of binge-eating disorder, a condition more common among women.
In addition to providing resources to patients and clinicians on women-specific health topics, the Agency continues to collect and analyze data to help the health care community understand trends related to some of the most important women's health issues. Statistical briefs have explored:
Women's health needs are unique. At AHRQ, we promise to continue doing our part to support women's health, whether it involves tracking trends or creating tools to help clinicians, researchers, and patients contribute to the cause.
Let's make every week Women's Health Week.
Dr. Arnold is Deputy Director of AHRQ.
Page last reviewed May 2017
Page originally created May 2017
Internet Citation: Providing The Tools To Improve Women's Health Care. Content last reviewed May 2017. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/blog/ahrqviews/womens-health-week.html

Tratamientos para la incontinencia fecal: Revisión de la investigación para adultos - Consumer Summary | AHRQ Effective Health Care Program

Tratamientos para la incontinencia fecal: Revisión de la investigación para adultos - Consumer Summary | AHRQ Effective Health Care Program

AHRQ News Now



Consumer Summary – May 10, 2017

Tratamientos para la incontinencia fecal: Revisión de la investigación para adultos

Formats

Table of Contents

¿Es esta información apropiada para mí?

Esta información es apropiada para usted si:

  • Su profesional de atención médica* dijo que usted o un ser querido tienen incontinencia fecal (FI, por su sigla en inglés). Las personas con FI tienen dificultad para retener las heces hasta que puedan llegar al baño. A veces puede que las heces se salgan por accidente. A la FI se le llama también "escape accidental de heces".
  • Usted quiere saber qué tratamientos existen para la FI y qué han encontrado los investigadores sobre la eficacia de cada tratamiento.
  • Usted o su ser querido tienen 18 años de edad o más. La información de este resumen proviene de investigaciones en adultos.

¿Qué aprenderé en este resumen?

Este resumen responderá a las preguntas siguientes:
  • ¿Qué es la FI?
  • ¿Qué opciones de tratamiento existen para la FI?
  • ¿Qué han encontrado los investigadores con respecto a la eficacia de los tratamientos para la FI?
  • ¿Cuáles son los efectos secundarios o complicaciones posibles de esos tratamientos?
  • ¿De qué debo hablar con mi profesional de atención médica?
Nota: Este resumen trata solamente de las investigaciones sobre los tratamientos para la FI. No incluye los productos que utilizan las personas con FI, como pañales, ropa interior desechable y productos para el cuidado de la piel.
* "Profesional de atención médica" puede referirse a su médico de atención primaria, gastroenterólogo (médico especialista en el aparato digestivo), proctólogo (médico especialista en enfermedades de colon, recto y ano), ginecólogo (médico especialista en el aparato reproductor femenino), uroginecólogo (médico specialista en trastornos del piso pélvico), cirujano, enfermera o asistente médico.

¿Cuál es la fuente de esta información?

Investigadores financiados por la Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (Agencia para la Investigación y la Calidad de la Atención Médica; AHRQ, por su sigla en inglés), una agencia de investigación del gobierno federal, revisaron estudios sobre el tratamiento de la incontinencia fecal publicados entre 1980 y junio de 2015. El informe incluyó 63 estudios que compararon un tratamiento con otro y 53 dedicados exclusivamente a la cirugía para tratar la FI. El informe fue revisado por profesionales de atención médica, investigadores, expertos y el público.

Conozca su condición

¿Qué es la incontinencia fecal?

La incontinencia fecal (FI) es una condición que ocurre cuando la persona tiene dificultad para retener las heces hasta que pueda llegar al baño. A veces puede que las heces se salgan por accidente. Las heces pueden ser sólidas o líquidas. A la FI se le llama también "escape accidental de heces".
Las heces son los desechos que salen del cuerpo durante la defecación. Las heces están formadas de alimentos no digeridos y moco. El moco es un líquido espeso que recubre el tubo digestivo.
Todo el alimento que no puede digerirse pasa al intestino grueso en la forma de heces. La última parte del intestino grueso se llama recto. Las heces permanecen en el recto hasta salir del cuerpo, a través del ano, durante la defecación.
Los músculos y nervios del recto y el ano mantienen las heces en el recto hasta que la persona esté lista para defecar. Un músculo en forma de anillo, llamado esfínter anal, funciona como una liga o banda de caucho alrededor del ano para mantenerlo firmemente cerrado. Los músculos del piso pélvico dan soporte a la vejiga, el recto y otros órganos. También ayudan a controlar la defecación.
Image of internal organs involved in digestion

¿Qué causa la FI?

Las causas de la FI pueden ser muy diversas; por ejemplo:
  • Daño a los músculos del esfínter o a los nervios que controlan los músculos del recto y el esfínter
    • Esto puede ser consecuencia del parto, una operación del recto o del ano, o por esforzarse frecuentemente para defecar.
    • Una lesión cerebral o de la médula espinal puede dañar los nervios que controlan los músculos del recto y del esfínter.
  • Pérdida de elasticidad o rigidez del recto
    • Puede ocurrir por una operación que afecte el recto o el ano, radioterapia para cáncer o por enfermedades intestinales inflamatorias (trastornos que causan irritación del revestimiento interno de la parte baja del sistema digestivo).
  • Inflamación de vasos sanguíneos situados dentro y alrededor de la parte baja del recto y del ano (lo que se llama hemorroides)
  • Condición en la que el recto sobresale a través del ano (el llamado prolapso rectal)
  • Diarrea
    • Las heces blandas son más difíciles de retener que las heces sólidas.

¿Qué tan frecuente es la FI?

  • En Estados Unidos, aproximadamente 1 de cada 12 personas tienen FI, lo que equivale a casi 18 millones de personas.
  • La FI es más frecuente en adultos mayores y en mujeres.

¿Que problemas puede causar la FI?

A muchas personas les causa vergüenza y molestia tener FI. Tienden a evitar las situaciones sociales por el temor de que se le escapen las heces. La FI puede limitar gravemente la capacidad para disfrutar del trabajo o de otras actividades. La falta de tratamiento de la FI puede dar lugar a erupciones en la piel, infecciones y otros problemas.

Conozca sus opciones

¿Cómo se trata la FI?

Se han utilizado muchos tratamientos para ayudar a las personas con FI:
  • Suplementos dietéticos con fibra
  • Medicamentos para la diarrea
  • Entrenamiento intestinal
  • Ejercicios para el piso pélvico (a veces, con biorretroalimentación)
  • Inyecciones para engrosar el esfínter anal
  • Cirugía

Suplementos dietéticos con fibra

Los suplementos dietéticos con fibra, como el psilio (psyllium, en inglés) pueden ayudar a solidificar las heces. Estos suplementos vienen en forma de pastillas o en polvo.

Medicamentos para la diarrea

Si su FI es causada por diarrea, un medicamento puede ayudar a detenerla. Ejemplos de medicamentos antidiarreicos son el difenoxilato (Lomotil®) y la loperamida (Imodium®).

Entrenamiento intestinal

El entrenamiento intestinal consiste en crear el hábito de defecar a determinadas horas del día. La persona puede intentarlo cuando despierta por la mañana o después de una comida. Pueden necesitarse varias semanas o meses para formar un hábito regular.

Entrenamiento de los músculos del piso pélvico con biorretroalimentación

En el entrenamiento de los músculos del piso pélvico (PFMT, por su sigla en inglés), la persona contrae y relaja los músculos que se usan para la defecación. A veces el PFMT se hace con biorretroalimentación. La biorretroalimentación le ayuda a ser más conciente de cómo funcionan sus músculos. Se colocan sensores en el ano y el recto para hacerle sentir que necesita defecar. Luego, los sensores registran cuando la persona contrae los músculos del piso pélvico y el esfínter anal. Esto le ayuda al profesional de atención médica a saber si el paciente contrae los músculos de manera correcta.

Inyecciones para engrosar el esfínter anal

Las inyecciones para engrosar el esfínter anal pueden ayudar a aumentar el tejido de alrededor del ano. Las inyecciones se aplican en las paredes del ano. Ayudan a estrechar la abertura del ano con la finalidad de evitar el escape de heces.

Cirugía

La cirugía puede ser útil en la FI causada por daño de nervios o músculos. La cirugía suele sugerirse solamente cuando otros tratamientos no funcionan. Existen varios tipos de cirugía para la FI.
Estimulación del nervio sacro
Se coloca un dispositivo pequeño bajo la piel en la parte baja de la espalda. El dispositivo aplica pulsos eléctricos para estimular los nervios que controlan los músculos del recto y el ano. Se coloca anestesia en la parte baja de la espalda para evitar el dolor cuando se pone el dispositivo bajo la piel. El procedimiento suele hacerse en un centro ambulatorio. El dispositivo funciona con una batería que dura cerca de 5 años. Cuando la batería se agote, se necesitará otro procedimiento para reemplazar el dispositivo.
Reparación del esfínter anal
Si tiene un desgarro en el esfínter anal, su médico puede recomendarle este tipo de cirugía. El desgarro puede ser causado por el parto o por una lesión. Para repararlo, el cirujano reconecta los extremos de los músculos. Esta operación se llama también esfinteroplastia.
Reemplazo del esfínter anal
El cirujano coloca un manguito alrededor del ano. El manguito va conectado a una pequeña bomba colocada bajo la piel. Cuando el manguito se llena de aire, actúa como los músculos del esfínter para cerrar el ano. Cuando va a defecar, la persona aprieta la bomba para que salga el aire del manguito y se abra el ano.
¿Qué han descubierto los investigadores sobre los tratamientos para la FI?
TratamientoLo que encontraron los investigadores
*No existe suficiente investigación para saber si el PFMT es eficaz por sí solo (sin biorretroalimentación).
El suplemento dietético con fibra psilio
  • Al parecer, después de tomarlo durante 1 mes, el psilio reduce el número de veces que ocurre la FI en algunas personas; sin embargo, se requiere mayor investigación para saberlo con certeza.
Medicamentos para la diarrea
  • No existe suficiente investigación para saber si los medicamentos antidiarreicos son eficaces para tratar la FI, ni en qué grado lo sean. Eso no significa que sean ineficaces, pero se necesita más investigación para saberlo con certeza.
Entrenamiento intestinal
  • No existe suficiente investigación para saber si el entrenamiento intestinal es eficaz para tratar la FI, ni en qué grado lo sea. Eso no significa que sea ineficaz, pero se necesita más investigación para saberlo con certeza.
Entrenamiento de los músculos del piso pélvico (PFMT), con biorretroalimentación*
  • En algunas personas, el PFMT con biorretroalimentación parece tener eficacia similar a la de las inyecciones para engrosar el esfínter anal en el corto plazo (hasta por 6 meses), aunque se requiere mayor investigación para saberlo con certeza.
  • Se necesita más investigación para saber qué tan eficaz es el PFMT con biorretroalimentación después de 6 meses.
Inyecciones para engrosar el esfínter anal
  • En algunas personas, las inyecciones para engrosar el esfínter anal parecen mejorar la calidad de vida y reducir el número de veces que ocurre FI en el corto plazo (hasta 6 meses), pero se requiere mayor investigación para saberlo con certeza.
  • Se necesita más investigación para conocer la eficacia de las inyecciones después de 6 meses.
Cirugía para FI (estimulación del nervio sacro, reparación o reemplazo del esfínter anal)
  • No existe suficiente investigación para saber si la cirugía es eficaz para tratar la FI, ni en qué grado lo sea. Eso no significa que sea ineficaz, pero se necesita más investigación para saberlo con certeza.

¿Cuáles son los efectos secundarios o complicaciones posibles de estos tratamientos de la FI?

Todos los tratamientos de la FI tienen posibles efectos secundarios y complicaciones. El hecho de que un efecto secundario o complicación sea posible no significa que usted lo tendrá.
Los investigadores observaron que:
  • Las personas que se sometieron a cirugía por FI tuvieron efectos secundarios y complicaciones con mayor frecuencia que las que recibieron tratamientos no quirúrgicos.
  • En general, los efectos secundarios de los tratamientos no quirúrgicos fueron leves.
  • Las complicaciones de la cirugía fueron más graves.
  • Las complicaciones más frecuentes ocurrieron con la cirugía anal para reemplazo del esfínter.
Posibles efectos secundarios o complicaciones de los tratamientos de incontinencia fecal
Opciones de tratamientoTratamientosPosibles efectos secundarios o complicaciones
*Podría necesitar una o mas operaciones para resolver el problema o reemplazar o retirar el dispositivo.
La sepsis, o septicemia, es una enfermedad grave que ocurre cuando el sistema inmunológico reacciona en exceso ante una infección. Causa inflamación en el cuerpo. Puede originar la formación de coágulos sanguíneos y fugas en vasos sanguíneos perforados, presión arterial muy baja y daño a sus órganos internos. Es posible que necesite cirugía para ayudar a eliminar la infección.
Tratamientos no quirúrgicosEl suplemento dietético con fibra psilio
  • Inflamación abdominal
  • Gas
  • Cólicos estomacales
Medicamentos antidiarreicos difenoxilato (Lomotil®) y loperamida (Imodium®)
  • Náuseas
  • Dolor o cólicos abdominales
  • Estreñimiento
Entrenamiento intestinal
  • No se conocen efectos secundarios
Entrenamiento de los músculos del piso pélvico con retroalimentación
  • No se conocen efectos secundarios
Inyecciones para engrosar el esfínter anal
  • Escape del agente engrosante inyectado
  • Sangrado en el lugar de la inyección
  • Infección
  • Inflamación (enrojecimiento, dolor e hinchazón) del recto
  • Dolor o sangrado en el recto
  • Escape de moco por el recto
  • Dolor durante la defecación
  • Picazón en el ano
  • Diarrea
  • Estreñimiento
  • Fiebre
CirugíaEstimulación del nervio sacro
  • Infección
  • Dolor
  • Problemas con el dispositivo*
Reparación del esfínter anal
  • Infección
  • Sepsis
  • El ano se vuelve demasiado estrecho
  • El intestino se tapa
  • Se forma un túnel, trayecto o agujero anormal bajo la piel cerca del ano (llamada fístula)
Reemplazo del esfínter anal
  • Infección
  • Sepsis
  • Escape u otros problemas con la herida quirúrgica alrededor del ano
  • Dolor
Nota: Es frecuente que las complicaciones de la reparación o el reemplazo del esfínter anal hagan necesaria otra operación. En casos graves, algunas complicaciones pueden hacer necesaria una colostomía. Para hacer una colostomía, el cirujano hace pasar el extremo del recto por una pequeña abertura en la pared del abdomen. Al irse formando, las heces se desplazan por el intestino grueso y el recto. Luego, salen por la abertura creada en el abdomen y se recogen en una bolsa situada fuera del cuerpo.

Tome una decisión

¿En qué debo pensar al tomar mi decisión sobre el tratamiento?

Tal vez desee hablar con su profesional de atención médica sobre:
  • Problemas que le preocupan, como tener que correr para encontrar rápido un baño, tener que ir muy seguido al baño, estar preparado para situaciones sociales y controlar su FI
  • El balance entre los beneficios y los efectos secundarios o complicaciones posibles de cada tratamiento
  • El costo de los tratamientos y qué parte del costo cubre su seguro
Pregunte a su profesional de atención médica
  • ¿Qué tratamiento cree que pueda ser mejor para mí?
  • ¿Podrían ayudar los cambios en mi alimentación?
  • Si me someto a cirugía, ¿cuánto tiempo tardaría mi recuperación?
  • ¿Por cuánto tiempo deberé continuar con los tratamientos?
  • ¿Cuánto tiempo me llevará saber si el tratamiento funciona? Si el tratamiento no ayuda, ¿cuándo debo visitarlo para probar algo diferente?
  • ¿Cuánto tiempo funcionará el tratamiento? ¿Puede dejar de funcionar?
  • ¿Cuáles son los posibles riesgos y beneficios del tratamiento?
  • ¿Cómo sabré si se me presenta un efecto secundario o una complicación? y ¿cuándo debo llamarle?
  • ¿Qué tan frecuentes son los efectos secundarios o complicaciones de cada tratamiento? ¿Cuán graves pueden ser?

Fuente

La información de este resumen proviene del informe Treatments for Fecal Incontinence (Tratamiento de la incontinencia fecal), de marzo de 2016. Fue producido por el Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center (Centro de Práctica Basada en la Evidencia de Minnesota), con financiamiento de la Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (Agencia para la Investigación y la Calidad de la Atención Médica; AHRQ, por su sigla en inglés).
Se obtuvo información adicional de la página web MedlinePlus®, un servicio de la National Library of Medicine (Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina) y de los National Institutes of Health (Institutos Nacionales de la Salud) de Estados Unidos. Esta página web está disponible en https://medlineplus.gov/spanish/.
Este resumen fue preparado por el John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine (Centro John M. Eisenberg para la Ciencia de las Comunicaciones y Decisiones Clínicas en la Facultad de Medicina de Baylor) en Houston, Texas. Este resumen fue revisado por personas con incontinencia fecal.