domingo, 16 de octubre de 2016

Genetic Counselor Workforce Issues: a Survey of Genetic Counselors Licensed in the State of Indiana. - PubMed - NCBI

Genetic Counselor Workforce Issues: a Survey of Genetic Counselors Licensed in the State of Indiana. - PubMed - NCBI



 2016 Oct 8. [Epub ahead of print]

Genetic Counselor Workforce Issues: a Survey of Genetic Counselors Licensed in the State of Indiana.

Abstract

The aims of this study were to document movement of genetic counselors (GCs) out of clinical positions and identify factors that might help employers attract and retain clinical GCs. A confidential on-line survey of GCs ever licensed in the state of Indiana was conducted. Of the 46 respondents, most provide direct patient care (69.6 %), have worked in their current position for 5 years or less (72.1 %), and are experienced genetic counselors, having graduated between 6 and 15 years ago (43.5 %). One-third (32.6 %) reported thinking about leaving their current position at least monthly. GCs were more likely to think about leaving their current position when they provided direct patient care (p = 0.04) and worked in a hospital/clinic setting (p = 0.01). Among the 18 respondents that changed jobs in the past two years, 55.6 % currently work in a laboratory/industry setting and 44.4 % provide direct patient care, compared to 8 % of those in a stable position (N = 25) who work in a laboratory/industry setting (p < 0.01) and 88 % who provide direct patient care (p < 0.01). Genetic counselors who have changed jobs within the past 2 years were more satisfied with the possibility for advancement (p = 0.01), the recognition for work they do (p = 0.03) and feeling value from the organization (p = 0.04) in their current positions than those who have not changed jobs. Salary and flexibility were most often reported as reasons for changing jobs. This is the first documentation of the movement of GCs out of clinical roles into industry positions. This changing landscape may impact the access to clinical services and the training of genetic counseling students. This data will provide employers with data to help attract and retain GCs in clinical roles.

KEYWORDS:

Access; Genetic counselors; Workforce issues

PMID:
 
27722951
 
DOI:
 
10.1007/s10897-016-0026-y

[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]