martes, 11 de octubre de 2016

Where We Are/What We Have Done – Two Years After Releasing Our FDASIA 907 Action Plan | FDA Voice

Where We Are/What We Have Done – Two Years After Releasing Our FDASIA 907 Action Plan | FDA Voice





Where We Are/What We Have Done – Two Years After Releasing Our FDASIA 907 Action Plan

By: Janice Soreth, M.D.
Since it’s been more than two years since FDA unveiled its Action Plan to advance the inclusion of diverse populations in clinical trials, we’d like to update you on how much we have accomplished, and acknowledge that continued commitment is critical in order to build on this foundation.
Janice SorethThe Congressional mandate under Section 907 of the FDA Safety and Innovation Act of 2012 required FDA to develop a report examining the extent to which various demographic groups were included in clinical trials and their outcomes reported in labeling for medical products for which applications were submitted to FDA. The legislation also required FDA to develop an Action Plan based on the report findings and input from stakeholders, issued in August 2014. The Action Plan identified 27 discrete actions for FDA to take within the three priority areas: improving data quality, encouraging greater clinical trial participation, and ensuring more data transparency.
As we discussed at our public meeting on February 29th, we have made progress on nearly every one of our action items and we continue to make strides.
In June 2016, FDA issued the draft guidance, “Evaluation and Reporting of Race and Ethnicity Data in Medical Device Clinical Studies.” We are also updating the 2005 “Guidance for Industry Collection of Race and Ethnicity Data in Clinical Trials.”
Our popular Drug Trials Snapshots, providing information about who participated in clinical trials supporting FDA-approved drugs and biologics, have now been posted on some 75 products. This innovative program developed by our Center for Drugs Evaluation and Research also highlights whether there were any differences in the benefits and side effects among sex, race, and age groups
We have significantly advanced efforts to raise clinical trials awareness. FDA’s Office of Women’s Health instituted a new initiative on “Diverse Women in Clinical Trials” that is disseminating consumer resources in English and Spanish and tools for clinical researchers in partnership with NIH’s Office of Research on Women’s Health. Our Office of Minority Health developed a tool kit and posted several public service announcements on FDA’s YouTube channel aimed at engaging patient participation. And we are currently reviewing the public comments from a range of organizations that we received to the public docket that was opened at the time of the public meeting.
Finally, I want to announce that I recently took over the chairmanship of the steering committee charged with implementing this plan. I am currently the Acting Associate Commissioner for Special Medical Programs, which has oversight of our advisory committee programs, combination products, and pediatric and orphan products programs among other responsibilities. Since joining FDA as a primary medical reviewer 25 years ago, I have served as CDER’s director of the division of Anti-Infectives and Ophthalmology and most recently spent five years in London as Deputy Director of the FDA Europe Office and Liaison to European Medicines Agency.
As we look back at our accomplishments, we believe that transparency in reporting about clinical trial inclusion will make a difference in encouraging broader demographic diversity and want to thank the former chair, Barbara Buch, M.D., of CBER, for her accomplishments. Going forward, I encourage you and all of our key stakeholders – patient and disease advocates, health professionals, and industry to continue partnering with us to advance this important work in ensuring demographic diversity and representation.
Janice Soreth, M.D., is Chair of the FDA Safety and Innovation Act Section 907 Steering Committee and the Acting Associate Commissioner for Special Medical Programs