lunes, 24 de octubre de 2016

CDC, The Pew Charitable Trusts: Sets Goals to Improve Prescribing for 3 Most Common

Inappropriate Antibiotic Selection Among US Ambulatory Care Visits | Infectious Diseases | JAMA Internal Medicine | The JAMA Network

CDC, The Pew Charitable Trusts:
Sets Goals to Improve Prescribing for 3 Most Common Conditions

CDC, The Pew Charitable Trusts, and other public health and medical experts, released new data and antibiotic prescribing targets for the three most common conditions seen in outpatient settings: sinus infections, middle ear infections, and pharyngitis (sore throat). The data and targets were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine.
Outpatient Anitbiotic  perscriptions 2010-11
Sinus infections, middle ear infections, and pharyngitis (or sore throat) account for nearly 45 million antibiotic prescriptions each year. Only half of patients with these infections received the first-line recommended drugs, based on prescribing guidelines. At least 80 percent of patients should receive the first-line antibiotics every time.
This is the second publication in a series that evaluates the state of antibiotic use in the United States and establishes national goals for improved prescribing practices in all health care settings. The first report, released in JAMA in May, found that at least 30 percent of antibiotics prescribed in U.S. outpatient settings are unnecessary.