domingo, 9 de octubre de 2016

Comparison of Informed Consent Preferences for Multiplex Genetic Carrier Screening among a Diverse Population. - PubMed - NCBI

Comparison of Informed Consent Preferences for Multiplex Genetic Carrier Screening among a Diverse Population. - PubMed - NCBI



 2016 Feb;25(1):166-78. doi: 10.1007/s10897-015-9854-4. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

Comparison of Informed Consent Preferences for Multiplex Genetic Carrier Screening among a Diverse Population.

Abstract

Multiplex genetic carrier screening is increasingly being integrated into reproductive care. Obtaining informed consent becomes more challenging as the number of screened conditions increases. Implementing a model of generic informed consent may facilitate informed decision-making. Current Wayne State University students and staff were invited to complete a web-based survey by blast email solicitation. Participants were asked to determine which of two generic informed consent scenarios they preferred: a brief versus a detailed consent. They were asked to rank the importance of different informational components in making an informed decision and to provide demographic information. Comparisons between informational preferences, demographic variables and scenario preferences were made. Six hundred ninety three participants completed the survey. When evaluating these generic consents, the majority preferred the more detailed consent (74.5%), and agreed that it provided enough information to make an informed decision (89.5%). Those who thought it would be more important to know the severity of the conditions being screened (p = .002) and range of symptoms (p = .000) were more likely to prefer the more detailed consent. There were no significant associations between scenario preferences and demographic variables. A generic consent was perceived to provide sufficient information for informed decision making regarding multiplex carrier screening with most preferring a more detailed version of the consent. Individual attitudes rather than demographic variables influenced preferences regarding the amount of information that should be included in the generic consent. The findings have implications for how clinicians approach providing tailored informed consent.

KEYWORDS:

Attitudes; Decision making; Genetic screening; Informed consent; Multiplex carrier screening; Preferences; Reproductive care

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]