martes, 18 de octubre de 2016

New FDA/EMA rare diseases and patient engagement clusters underway | FDA Voice

New FDA/EMA rare diseases and patient engagement clusters underway | FDA Voice











New FDA/EMA rare diseases and patient engagement clusters underway

By: Jonathan Goldsmith, M.D., FACP, and Sandy Kweder, M.D., RADM (Ret.) US Public Health Service
Drug development and approval happens across the globe and we at FDA strive to collaborate with other countries and international regulatory agencies to ensure public health. One of our most valuable collaborators is the European Medicines Agency (EMA) — our counterpart agency for drug regulation in Europe that coordinates a network of 4,500 scientists and evaluates and supervises medicines for more than 500 million people in 31 countries.
Dr. Jonathan Goldsmith
Jonathan C. Goldsmith, M.D., FACP, FDA’s Associate Director Rare Diseases Program, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of New Drugs
For more than a decade, FDA and EMA scientists have collaborated to help solve some of our biggest challenges. We work with them in groups called “clusters.” The first cluster was initiated in 2004. Since then clusters have been formed to focus on treatments for children; establish effective measures for the development and use of biosimilar medications as cost effective alternatives to brand name biologic drugs; evaluate new treatments for patients with cancer; set standards to help develop medicines personalized to a patient’s genetic makeup, and much more. Both agencies have benefited from this joint work. The EMA summarizes these and our other clusters on its website.
We are excited about the initiation of our most recent cluster activity with our EMA colleagues. Just last month we established a cluster that will work to advance treatments for patients with rare diseases. This cluster’s primary goal is for FDA and EMA scientists to share valuable information about their work and to collaborate on certain review aspects of rare disease drug development programs. FDA’s core members of the cluster include experts from FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Rare Diseases Program, the Office of Pediatric Therapeutics, the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research’s director’s office, and the Office of Orphan Products Development, but other experts will be engaged on specific topic areas as the cluster evolves. Among many other important activities, our agencies will collaborate on:
  • Identification and validation of trial end points;
  • Potential trial designs when only small populations of patients are available for testing the safety and effectiveness of prospective new therapies;
  • Ways to apply flexibility in evaluation of drug development programs;
  • Expediting the review and approval of drugs to treat rare diseases to bring new drugs to patients in need as soon as possible.
Sandra Kweder
Sandra Kweder, M.D., Rear Admiral (Ret.) US Public Health Service, FDA’s Deputy Director, Europe Office, and Liaison to European Medicines Agency
Our work also builds on another exciting and recent development — a patient engagementcluster formed in June 2016 to incorporate the patient’s involvement and viewpoint in the drug development process. FDA and EMA are interested in understanding patient’s experiences and gaining input on their tolerance for risk and uncertainty, on current therapy and its benefits or shortcomings and on the benefits that patients seek. This cluster, among other valuable efforts, will:
  • Help each agency learn how the other involves patients in their work, and to develop common goals of expanding future engagement activities with patients;
  • Discuss ways for finding patients that can serve as spokespersons for their community;
  • Explore ideas to help train selected patients and advocates to effectively participate in agency activities, and;
  • Develop strategies for reporting the significant impact of patient involvement.
Given the focus of both of these new clusters, we expect they will address new areas of interest and also draw on expertise from all of the other clusters, such as oncology, pediatrics, and orphan diseases, contributing to more advanced and robust collaborations across both of our organizations.
Focusing on patients with rare diseases and working to advance patient input enhances the value of our cluster activities. With our colleagues at the EMA we look forward to accomplishing more than what we can individually.
Jonathan C. Goldsmith, M.D., FACP, FDA’s Associate Director, Rare Diseases Program, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of New Drugs
Sandra Kweder, M.D., Rear Admiral (Ret.) US Public Health Service, FDA’s Deputy Director, Europe Office, and Liaison to European Medicines Agency