lunes, 20 de marzo de 2017

MMWR Vol. 66 / No. 10 ► Trends in Suicide by Level of Urbanization — United States, 1999–2015 Weekly / March 17, 2017 / 66(10);270–273

Trends in Suicide by Level of Urbanization — United States, 1999–2015 | MMWR

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MMWR Weekly
Vol. 66, No. 10
March 17, 2017


Trends in Suicide by Level of Urbanization — United States, 1999–2015


Scott R. Kegler, PhD1; Deborah M. Stone, ScD2; Kristin M. Holland, PhD2 (View author affiliations)
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Summary

What is already known about this topic?
The U.S. suicide rate has been increasing since 2000. Rates in less urban areas have been higher than rates in more urban areas, with some evidence of a growing difference.
What is added by this report?
During 1999–2015, suicide rates increased across all levels of urbanization, with the gap in rates between less urban and more urban areas widening over time, most conspicuously over the later part of this period. Geographic disparities in suicide rates might reflect suicide risk factors known to be prevalent in less urban areas, such as limited access to mental health care, social isolation, and the opioid overdose epidemic, because opioid misuse is associated with increased risk for suicide. That the gap in rates began to widen more noticeably after 2007–2008 might reflect the influence of the economic recession, which disproportionately affected less urban areas.
What are the implications for public health practice?
There is a growing need for comprehensive suicide prevention employing a broad public health approach. This might include strategies applicable for all communities (e.g., strengthening economic support during times of financial hardship and teaching coping and problem-solving skills) along with strategies that address subsets of the population at increased risk, such as rural communities (e.g., programs that address provider shortages and promote social connectedness). CDC’s technical package of multisector policies, programs, and practices serves as a resource for states and communities to guide decision-making based on the best available evidence for preventing suicide.

Scott R. Kegler, PhD1; Deborah M. Stone, ScD2; Kristin M. Holland, PhD2 (View author affiliations)
View suggested citation