jueves, 3 de noviembre de 2016

Supporting warrior care through interagency, international relationships | Health.mil

Supporting warrior care through interagency, international relationships | Health.mil

Health.mil

Supporting warrior care through interagency, international relationships

Dr. Linda Spoonster Schwartz, assistant secretary for policy and planning for the Department of Veterans Affairs, addressed the audience during a panel discussion on international and interagency relationships at James A. Haley Veteran’s Hospital in Tampa, Florida, Oct. 27, 2016. (MHS photo)



Dr. Linda Spoonster Schwartz, assistant secretary for policy and planning for the Department of Veterans Affairs, addressed the audience during a panel discussion on international and interagency relationships at James A. Haley Veteran’s Hospital in Tampa, Florida, Oct. 27, 2016. (MHS photo)



MIlitary Health System providers, U.S. federal agencies and allied international military partners all have a common goal: provide the best care possible for wounded warriors.
“It’s important work that we all have to do in our respective countries,” said James Rodriguez, deputy assistant secretary of Defense for the Office of Warrior Care Policy. “It’s also important for us to do this together as an international coalition.”
Rodriguez was part of the recent Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium, a gathering in Tampa, Florida, that brought together attendees from various countries and backgrounds of expertise looking to find ways to support service members and their families through resiliency, recovery and rehabilitation, and reintegration. During the final day of the meeting, the group gathered at the James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital to discuss cooperation in these efforts among the U.S. military and its allies, as well as the U.S. government. Dr. Linda Spoonster Schwartz, assistant secretary for policy and planning, Department of Veterans Affairs, said interagency care and coordination is something that needs tending in order to assure service members experience the best transition out of active duty.
“When people are leaving the military, it’s kind of a confusing system and that’s why paving the way from the Department of Defense to Veterans Affairs is a real important issue,” said Schwartz, speaking during the symposium. As the needs of those transitioning out change, the responses to their needs should change as well, she said, stressing trust, teamwork, adaptability, accountability and a focus on outcomes.
Panelists representing four countries spoke to attendees about their mission to provide care for service members and veterans and the ways they go about this task. Many of the panelists also spoke of support and collaboration with other organizations and countries, reiterating the importance of interagency and international relationships.
“When you take care of your fellow human being who happens to be a veteran and has protected your way of life, to me, that’s as good as it gets,” said Joe Battle, medical center director of the James A. Haley Veteran’s Hospital and Clinics. “We’re very proud of the fact that we’re able to do that.”
Panelists also answered questions that touched on topics such as employment in the civilian world, the media’s impact on care for and perception of veterans’ needs, and outreach programs for service members as they transition and reintegrate into civilian life.
The third and final day of the symposium featured a tour of the Tampa Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center and a demonstration on telehealth, Next year’s symposium will take place in Canada.
“What we’re looking for is no ‘wrong door,’” said Schwartz. “Our goal is timely, appropriate, effective care and service.”




Warrior Care VA visit

Photo
11/2/2016
Dr. Linda Spoonster Schwartz, assistant secretary for policy and planning for the Department of Veterans Affairs, addressed the audience during a panel discussion on international and interagency relationships at James A. Haley Veteran’s Hospital in Tampa, Florida, Oct. 27, 2016. (MHS photo)
Dr. Linda Spoonster Schwartz, assistant secretary for policy and planning for the Department of Veterans Affairs, addressed the audience during a panel discussion on international and interagency relationships at James A. Haley Veteran’s Hospital in Tampa, Florida, Oct. 27, 2016. (MHS photo)
Related Topics:DoD/VA Sharing InitiativesWarrior Care

Traversing obstacles at the new terrain park

Article
11/1/2016
The new terrain park outside of the Military Advanced Training Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center provides another means for Walter Reed Bethesda physical therapists to simulate uneven terrain for their amputee patients without having to go to specific destinations to do so. (DoD photo by Mark Oswell)
Physical therapists use the new terrain park to simulate uneven terrain for their amputee patients
Related Topics:Military Hospitals and ClinicsWarrior CareExtremities Loss

Collaboration, shared learning are key themes as the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium begins

Article
10/27/2016
Warrior Care in the 21st Century
Senior defense leaders and representatives from 14 nations kicked off the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium
Related Topics:Warrior Care

Guice, Rodriguez provide opening remarks at Warrior Care symposium

Article
10/26/2016
Dr. Karen Guice, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, provided remarks at the first day of the second annual Warrior Care in the 21st Century Symposium in Tampa, Florida. “We fight together and we heal together,” she said of the collaborative approach and engagement that was represented by attendees. “Sharing our approaches and our research in solving the kind of problems that lead to innovative ways to address and solve each one together – this work never stops. Now is not the time to become complacent or reduce our focus, nor is it the time to limit investments.” (Courtesy photo)
Karen Guice, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, along with James Rodriguez Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Office of Warrior Care Policy, Office of the Secretary of Defense provided opening remarks for attendees
Related Topics:Warrior Care

Women face unique challenges when getting a prosthesis

Article
10/21/2016
Army Spc. Cherdale Allen shows off two of her prosthetic legs: one for walking and the other for high heels.
For military women who have to get a prosthesis, there are considerations unique to them. Among them are a more natural look and a prosthesis that works with traditional women’s fashions.
Related Topics:Women's HealthWarrior CarePhysical DisabilityExtremities Loss

Army honors wounded, ill and injured Soldiers during Warrior Care Month

Article
10/19/2016
November is Warrior Care Month
Each November the Army honors wounded, ill and injured Soldiers and their families by commemorating Warrior Care Month
Related Topics:Warrior Care

International leaders to discuss 21st century military health, warrior care priorities

Article
10/17/2016
National flags representing the 13 countries who attended the 2015 Warrior Care in the 21st Century symposium were on display at last year's event in Bethesda, Maryland
Established in 2015, the Warrior Care in the 21st Century coalition simplifies global sharing of warrior care best practices and lessons learned
Related Topics:Warrior Care

The impact of traumatic brain injuries on community life

Article
9/27/2016
A soldier at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s traumatic brain injury clinic in Alaska takes a cognitive hand-eye coordination test on a driving stimulator.
Dealing with the repercussions of a TBI, many find aspects of adjusting back into their communities difficult
Related Topics:Traumatic Brain InjuryWarrior Care

Bono reinforces support for disabled veterans, advocacy efforts

Article
9/23/2016
Defense Health Agency director Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono delivers keynote address to attendees of the Paralyzed Veterans of America’s ‘Mission:ABLE’ awards ceremony in downtown Washington, DC.
DHA director Vice Adm. Bono lauds the efforts of award recipients at the Paralyzed Veterans of America’s (PVA)‘Mission: ABLE’ awards ceremony and says advocacy groups help DHA serve disabled veterans.
Related Topics:Quality and Safety of Health CareWarrior Care

Model Program aims to prevent effects of trauma on children and families of patients

Article
9/13/2016
After 2003, a large number of injured service members, their children and families arrived to the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center and they needed Operation BRAVE Families help. (U.S. Army photo)
As a part of the injured service member’s care team, OBF receives information about who arrives to the hospital, whether they have children, how many, and if the children are at WRNMMC with the parent or not
Related Topics:Preventive HealthWarrior Care

Precision medicine offers individualized health care instead of “one-size-fits-all”

Article
8/23/2016
Dr. Mark Haigney discusses his views on precision medicine to researchers at the MHS Research Symposium on Aug. 17, 2016.
Precision medicine is an innovative approach that may revolutionize the way we improve health and treat diseases.
Related Topics:Medical Research and DevelopmentMHS Research SymposiumDoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

A driven competitor, one Marine overcame setbacks to become medal-winning athlete

Article
7/27/2016
Staff Sergeant Anthony Mannino Jr. competed in the cycling event during the 2016 Warrior Games in West Point, New York. By the end of this year’s competition, he came home with silver medals in three events: wheelchair basketball, shot put and discus. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Patrick Onofre/Released)
After struggling with a TBI for years, Staff Sgt. Anthony Mannino Jr. credits his therapy sessions at NICoE in helping him focus on training for the 2016 Warrior Games.
Related Topics:Warrior CareTraumatic Brain InjuryInnovation

Maxillofacial prosthodontics brings normalcy to wounded patients

Article
7/20/2016
Air Force Maj. Stephen Cherrington (right), 59th Dental Group maxillofacial prosthodontist, checks the fitting of retired Army Master Sgt. Todd Nelson’s prosthetic ear at the San Antonio Military Medical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas.
Disfigured by circumstances while abroad or at home, maxillofacial prosthodontics gives wounded warriors, veterans and civilians a chance at living a normal life
Related Topics:Access to Health CareMilitary Hospitals and ClinicsQuality and Safety of Health CareWarrior Care

National Intrepid Center zeroes in on traumatic brain injury

Article
7/19/2016
The National Intrepid Center of Excellence, a directorate of the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., helps active duty, reserve, and National Guard members and their families manage their traumatic brain injuries and accompanying psychological health conditions through diagnostic evaluation, treatment planning, outpatient clinical care, and TBI research.
The National Intrepid Center of Excellence, a directorate of the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, helps active duty, reserve, and National Guard members and their families manage their traumatic brain injuries
Related Topics:Access to Health CareMilitary Hospitals and ClinicsQuality and Safety of Health CareResearch and InnovationWarrior CareTraumatic Brain InjuryDefense Medical Surveillance System

Guice: MHS and VA work together to help wounded warriors navigate care system

Article
6/29/2016
Dr. Karen Guice, acting assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, addresses the National Academies of Sciences Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence in Washington, D.C., June 27, 2016.
Service members are surviving their battlefield injuries better than ever before. During a panel session at the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Karen Guice, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, explained how a new system is making sure government agencies are in synch when those wounded warriors go for medical treatment.
Related Topics:Warrior CareDoD/VA Sharing InitiativesInteragency Care Coordination Committee